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BUY Nebivolol ONLINE WITHOUT PRESCRIPTION

Author: Tafari, Monday, February 4th, 2008 at 6:08 AM

BUY Nebivolol ONLINE WITHOUT PRESCRIPTION, So on my last post, I mentioned that Suite Suzy & I discussed what is meant by the term “Black Experience”.

Basically, my position was I do not know what it means & no sure if I grew up in the “Black Experience”. Suite Suzy who essentially grew up in a white household thinks the “Black Experience” can be broken down into different socioeconomic classes of Black folk & that the term can apply across the board, order Nebivolol no prescription. Nebivolol gel, ointment, cream, pill, spray, continuous-release, extended-release, Suite Suzy also says that there really is no “Black Experience” & thinks the construct is stupid.

For the hell of it, I asked if we are living the Black Experience now & she says no, australia, uk, us, usa. Nebivolol for sale, What makes us different than the Australians next door other than skin complexion & sex appeal. I tend to agree with my boo (rare) on this one, order Nebivolol online c.o.d, Buy Nebivolol without prescription, but want to hear from you out there.

My experience:
I grew up in a household 1 of 3 children (different dads), single mother (most times), buying Nebivolol online over the counter, Canada, mexico, india, on welfare until I was around 10, in a relatively poor neighborhood(s) in Birmingham & Detroit, where to buy Nebivolol. Buy generic Nebivolol, So my question is, did I live the “Black Experience” & is my experience so different than other races or others within my race.

Now, online buying Nebivolol hcl, Real brand Nebivolol online, I live in middle class environment, have a stable family & job, buy Nebivolol from mexico, Order Nebivolol from mexican pharmacy, love fried perch sandwiches with hot sauce, shop at Whole Foods & on the winning side of the digital divide, japan, craiglist, ebay, overseas, paypal. Comprar en línea Nebivolol, comprar Nebivolol baratos, Does this mean that my kids are missing the Black Experience???

  • Is there such a thing as a “Black Experience”?
  • Is this a self-imposed or white term (like African American (you already know how I feel about that))?
  • Have you or have you live[d] the “Black Experience”?
  • Does the common thread of racial identity make us one?
  • Is there a socioeconomic division that separates some Blacks from the rest?
  • Did Obama not really live the "Black Experience"??. (bonus questions...)

Since it is Black History month, kjøpe Nebivolol på nett, köpa Nebivolol online, Ordering Nebivolol online, I expect some damn answers from yo' ass, so talk to me!

Bygbaby.com Mindspill

And since we are on the subject, purchase Nebivolol online, Buy Nebivolol from canada, but not really, here is a shot of me living the "Black Experience" with my iPhone & Mudcloth printed scarf by Aziz, order Nebivolol no prescription. Buy no prescription Nebivolol online,

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22 Responses to “BUY Nebivolol ONLINE WITHOUT PRESCRIPTION”

  1. Erica C. Says:

    I think that the experiences that we have, whether it be black, white, native american, etc. are unique to that particular person and situation. I think we’ve become so adapted to pinning our experiences to that of our race when in actuality, our experiences are somewhat the same (as human beings) we just tend to stereotype them and add race as an issue. Thus having a “black experience” etc.

    If you have a young black girl and a young white girl growing up in public housing, both girl’s mother and grandmother were products of welfare, uneducated, and jobless. Both girls grow up and repeat this cycle as adults.

    For each girl. Would this be a “black experience” or a “White experience” In my opinion this would be a “human experience” because both races shared the same experience.

    I’m not denying that one race has gone through more than any the other because Lord knows we’ve been through hell and back. I’m not ignoring that fact.

    I just think that our experiences are just that……our experiences and should not be pinned to a particular race.

    *And this is just my opinion*

    Good post Byg!


  2. Darius T. Williams Says:

    Is there such a thing as a “Black Experience”?

    Hell YES – there is. And, the reality is that we’re not moving away from it either. I mentor teenagers from the inner city – hell, I live in the inner city. And although I have slightly disassociated myself w/the culture around me – it’s so evident that it’s there. It really reminds me of when I was growing up.

    Is this a self-imposed or white term (like African American (you already know how I feel about that))?

    Sure – it’s self imposed – but for good reasons. How else do you explain not knowing you were dirt poor until you got to be about 17 or 18 years old and realized there was more to life than you realized? How else do you explain not having board games and being forced to be creative as hell to come up with games like “church” and “office” and “restaurant?” How else can you explain it? It’s nothing but the Black Experience.

    Have you or have you live[d] the “Black Experience”?

    Already answered this one. I am a bona fide product of the Black Experience…and proud of it. It’s made me appreciative of life, given me a greater understanding of purpose, and has grounded the hell out of me. I would exchange any minute of it.

    Does the common thread of racial identity make us one?

    Externally, sure. But affluent blacks have a different perspective on life versus us common folk. It’s no doubt that we’re all on. But, the folks who didn’t come up through the Black Experience have no idea how to handle huge adversity. It’s something about the Black Experience that prepared you for life!

    Did Obama not really live the “Black Experience”??? (bonus questions…)

    Hell no! But, I think the brother can definitely associate. He realized after graduating Columbia in CHicago that he had to make a change. AFter a stint in local politics and community organizing he went to Harvard. He made a difference in his 8 years as our Illinois State Senator. I think of all the candidates, he’s extremely well rounded and although he didn’t grow up in the Black Experience. I sure do have a hunch that that the brother can definitely associate.


  3. Malik Says:

    Two words come to mind when I think of “The Black Experience”: transcend & transform. I think the Black experience has a single common thread, and that’s the necessity to overcome the limitations other people put on us because of their perception of what Blackness means. In the process, we take experiences that were meant to limit and diminish us, and with that creative and spiritual genius that’s peculiar to Black folks, transform them into tools that sustain and uplift us, best example being the Black church (preacher pimps notwithstanding). Like my momma always said, nobody can make somethin’ out of nothin’ like a ghetto child.


  4. Jovan Says:

    Ya know, I often wonder about that myself.

    I had the typical ghetto stereotypes in my childhood household.

    The teenage mother, dope dealing uncle, junkie grandfather, gay uncle, crazy immigrant neighbors, and bums and winos outside the building at all hours of the day and night.

    Now, I’m solidly middle class, my wife and I are working on the masters degrees, own my home, about to buy my first rental property, etc.

    My kids will more than likely go to private school or an elite public school and will never know the struggle that I went through.

    Personally, I think the “Black Experience” is one of culture. My babies will be exposed to all of the things that I love ( popeye’s fried chicken, Biggie Smalls, and John Coltrane records ) so in that respect they will have the full Black Experience. Black does not equal poor or ghetto and I think too many of us think that it does.


  5. Invisible Woman Says:

    I grew up supposedly “well off” two parents (still married), educated professional parents, upscale neighborhood, no one in the family on drugs or in jail, blah blah blah…..but that did not shield me from the racist experience, which is what I associate with “the black exoerience” which is being followed in a store, having to work like a slave on a plantation while Miss Anne files her nails and you get equal accolades, being pulled over by a cop for nothing, “special inspection” at an airport, ignored trying to get service in a restuarant, getting grilled to the ninth degree trying to get an apartment…..

    You get the idea. I associate the oppression that we receive on a very daily basis and the strength and things we do to overcome and not let it bring us down as the “black experience”. I believe it is very unique to us and us only….thru many shades and complexions of black as well.


  6. Invisible Woman Says:

    btw, I have read Obama’s autobiography, and to all and Al Sharpton who think he is not “black enough” believe me, he has paid his dues and thensome. He just doesn’t let it determine the course of his life…very admirable.


  7. Lola Gets Says:

    Yes, I do think there is a thing as a “Black Experience” but I dont think there is just ONE Black Experience, but there are many. There are some experiences that we share as a community, and then there are those that are somewhat rarer, but not completely unheard of.

    Yes, Ive lived the Black Experience (BE). Ive lived the Bourgeois BE; when I was younger, I had a brush with the Homeless BE; Ive had the Only Black Chick In the Classroom BE; and so much more! And while not EVERY Black person has had ALL of my experiences, I know I can find at least one other that has, lol. That in and of itself makes that experience a BE.

    Of course theres socioeconomic divisions that seperate Blacks. There are class differences that seperate people of ALL ethnicities, and its just a fact of life. It doesnt make any one group more or less “Black” in my opinion, just different.

    Im leaving it off there, lol.

    L


  8. Renea Says:

    You’ve been tagged. Living la vida negra, right here.


  9. shan Says:

    I see it like this – and Tafari, I totally believe in the black experience! lol However, I do get your point….

    Here’s my story.
    I grew up in a middle class household with two college educated parents. I got the black experience in my household. It was an experience full of pride, consciousness and understanding of who I am as a black woman and where I fit into the model of society. Even though I had a lot of great experiences with my upbringing, I am still a black woman. No matter what the background – we as black folk go through a lot. If you place me beside a black woman who is a millionaire or who is the product of poverty we will both be seen as black women. This is part of the black experience IMO.

    NOW – in my childhood, I was raised in a 90% white environment. So I went to an HBCU and it was the FIRST and I mean VERY first time I had been around so many black people. THe icing on the cake was that I had so much in common with these folks. That was another aspect of the black experience for me – being surrounding by people who LOOK like me.

    Lastly – it is what you make it (cliche). I say that b/c each “black” experience is unique to each black person. No one can understand what it’s like to stand in th shoes of a black woman or man on a daily basis, just as we don’t know what it’s like to stand in the shoes of those who are not black. Unfortunately, in America Race matters – so whatever experience you have, you can easily tag ‘race’ as the adjective – i.e. black experience, black music, black neighborhood, black vernacular…..etc.


  10. Smitty Says:

    I think it’s a term created by white folks…Most people just call it poverty. So if your living comfortably your living the “white experience”?

    If a white family lives on the same hood as you growing up are they living the black experience? Or are they just poor like the Black family who lives down the block.

    I think if you have melanin and kinky hair you automatically live the Black experience in America. Cause we get treated differently. Thats the real Black experience.


  11. Johnston Says:

    There’s no such thing as the Black Experience. If a person can be raised by non-Blacks in an environment of non-Blacks and still be considered Black, then Black has no meaning.


  12. Bygbaby Says:

    I asked & I received!!! I am seeing obvious trends here in terms of mindset & the existence or lack there of on the Black Experience. I appreciate all of the honesty & for yall putting your business & background on front. We can’t be shame on the past. It got us here!!!

    Erica – “I think we’ve become so adapted to pinning our experiences to that of our race when in actuality, our experiences are somewhat the same (as human beings)” My boo read this earlier today & was like hello! nuff said.

    No matter what race will always be injected because America is addicted to race & that will never change IMO.

    Darius – Man you put it all out & broke it down. I love it! “And although I have slightly disassociated myself w/the culture around me – it’s so evident that it’s there.” OK that sounds tough, how do you manage that without losing your mind? Or does your community work keep you grounded enough to stay in the trenches?

    Malik – So much of what you said is on point but “Like my momma always said, nobody can make somethin’ out of nothin’ like a ghetto child.” reminds me of how we had to make up ghetto games, flip on piss & cum stained mattresses on in the alley for fun & exercise (if I only knew what I know know I would have not done many things). Rock fight or kick ball anyone??? Also thanks for running through!

    Jovan – Ummm, we might be cousins cause we have the same uncles!!! LOL. “Black does not equal poor or ghetto and I think too many of us think that it does.” More of us & others need to know this! Unfortunately, I think it will take a miracle to wake many from the Matrix get get out of that mindset!

    And Popeye’s will round out any experience. I am mad you mentioned that because now I want a 2 piece spicy with red beans & rice with an extra biscuit with strawberry jelly. Damn, I may have to make that trip to Detroit Saturday to quench the need.

    Invisible Woman – “I associate the oppression that we receive on a very daily basis and the strength and things we do to overcome and not let it bring us down as the “black experience”.” Great point! I think the basis of our coming to America solidified a unilateral “Black Experience” but once we’s got us free, things changed for us especially when you through in class & status.

    Lola – “Yes, I do think there is a thing as a “Black Experience” but I don’t think there is just ONE Black Experience, but there are many.” So you basically are on the same page. It all boils down to life & then you happen to be a Negro on top of it all, which gives another set of circumstances (most times)!

    Renea – You know I’m cussing!!! I will make it happen some time this week, perhaps Thursday!!!

    Shan[da] – Sounds like a page from “It’s a Real World” LOL. You know, when I traveled throughout Europe & talked to other Africans in the Diaspora, we had so many things in common outside of pigmentation it was a trip laughing & talking about things that made us , us in a broad sense, which is somewhat like you time in college.

    In terms of “Black Experience” with raising my kids, I make it a strong point to be proud of who & what you are 360º! Black history is everyday, we go to most Black productions that run through time, read & anything else I can make happen. If I do not teach it, then all is lost.

    Smitty – “I think if you have melanin and kinky hair you automatically live the Black experience in America. Cause we get treated differently. Thats the real Black experience.” You cannot get more on point that that.

    Johnston – “If a person can be raised by non-Blacks in an environment of non-Blacks” The thought of that makes me shiver & other things run in my mind in terms of parenting. I’m sure there is love in those environments but I cannot help but to think that some disservice is being done to that Black child. I could on & on but I will not since I have a few posts on the subject. Search the archive boo. Thanks for running through Boo!


  13. AnnaC Says:

    I don’t think there is one black experience anymore than there is one Latino or Hispanic experience.

    Since we are all living different realties in terms of family composition, relative means, and educational experiences, it is difficult to impossible to define an Experience.

    However, if you are not white, you are certainly living a different experience regardless of your family situation, wealth and even educational experience.

    One hopes that this will change… and some younger folks coming up report that they don’t feel they are not seeing color the way we did and our parents did and our grandparents did, etc.

    I would love to believe that… but given that I feel my life becoming increasingly segregated as I get older, it’s hard to believe that color lines will go away. Class and race and assumptions about class based on race continue to carve out different experiences for people of color.


  14. byrdparker Says:

    In the world of mutlicuturalism , our experiences are eliminated , in favor of a more homgenized experience. This is a extremely dangerous, Stepford existance. The question to ask is : Why is it so bad that we are different? Why do we need a preconcieved homgenized blueprint for all to follow .

    The black experience is our black culture . It is infinite and intangible , you cannot put it into words, to help one confine it , comparmentalize and issue stereotypes . It has nothing to do with your wealth , or your social status / job within a community . Different people from different tribes relate to each other in a non generic specific manner , it is inherent and bred into a person , from years and years of living life a certain way within certain environments. Its natural selection , evolution .

    The word experience , makes me think of a situation , i.e. what is the black experience at such and such workplace , or the black experience in america , in europe and so on .

    Also to think of it simply if your black , everyday is a black experience . It seems as though black experience is a blanket term with really no meaning , it is the black culture which is important .

    please tell me your thoughts?


  15. ayankha Says:

    My goodness, what a good post! I actually took a class last semester called “Psychology of the Black Experience” at Howard University. This question was one of 2 on the very first test and since we had an unlimited time period to answer it, I took 6 hours and a whole Bluebook. So I will spare you the juicy details for the sake of your blog. But my thoughts in a nutshell:

    There is a Black Experience. This is due to: 1. being Black in America has implications that transcend economic class. Whether good or bad or nuetral, you best believe it is NOTED (hence, Obama’s race being brought up) 2. Black Americans are INVOLUNTARY MINORITIES (Check out works by John Ogbu that discuss the implications of this). 3. There is not a singular Black experience, yet there are common threads amongst Black people in America beyond racism. One of my favorites is TRIOS by Black psycholgist James Jones. “TRIOS is comprised of attitudes, beliefs and values about time, rhythm, improvisation, orality and spirituality.” (See http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1540-4560.t01-1-00014?journalCode=josi)

    Self imposed= Yes in some ways and No in others. Elements of both.

    My B. E.= Of Course! Everyday!

    Racial ID= Makes us a “collective” for sure. Its funny because whether or not you want to identify with being Black, it is one of those groups you can’t eject yourself out of (maybe only Michael Jackson has come the closest).

    SES Divide= It is real. But it shouldn’t be. I think back to the stories I’ve heard about Black neighborhoods being unified- Doctors living next to Janitors. But I think since integration & drugs hit hard, the divide became more apparent and perhaps wider.

    Obama= Sure.

    PS- I didn’t know you lived in B’ham for a while. That was were I met the love of my life & is my future home-city. Big Up!


  16. Shai Says:

    I don’t know if there is a “black experience”. Shoot, I lived in a neighborhood where each household of my friends, they experienced something different. I was raised mostly by my grandma who raised also my other two cousins even though our moms lived there too. We each had our own unique experiences within the same household.

    So I would love to know what this “black experience” is to different folks.


  17. Tamra Says:

    Alright, Mr. Talk Show Host (lol)…
    This is somewhat of a loaded issue, but a really great post.

    Is there such a thing as a “Black Experience”?
    There is, and I think people experience it to varying degrees. I agree with a lot of what’s been said here already, especially with ayankha. I grew up in a “black” household, in a decent “black” neighborhood, went to an approx. 98% “black” high school, and went to a “black college” for undergrad. [Was a double-dutch pro, got my hair cornrowed on the weekends, went to the hole-in-the-wall beauty shops, corner store for Funyuns and Lemonheads, etc…]

    Now, because I was always the lone black person (or one of very few) at a lot of extracurricular events– including my own (classical) piano recitals and other educational functions, and then when I went to a majority school for grad school—I’d have to say I felt a difference. Not because I was expecting there to be one, but because there just was one. Sometimes I’ve expected there to be one and there sure enough was. –And then, sometimes I’ve expected there to be one and there wasn’t.

    [Oh, and did I mention I’ve been profiled twice? That sure felt “black” if there ever was such an experience or emotion…]

    Is this a self-imposed or white term (like African American (you already know how I feel about that))?
    I don’t know if it’s self-imposed, but I think it *can be* self-limiting. Depends on perspective. I think it’s also a “cultural” descriptor.

    Have you or have you live[d] the “Black Experience”?
    See above.

    Does the common thread of racial identity make us one?
    Not necessarily. Honestly, sometimes I’ve felt most like an outsider among my own people, and it’s not because I want to. There are lots of weird groups, cliques and subdivisions amongst us, and I’ve not found that I fit in to any of them to the point that I feel a sense of “unity.” Identify and share commonalities with some of them, sure. “One with”–no. I am of the opinion that race is a social construct anyway, so I *prefer* to view us all as human beings first. I get more of a feeling of one-ness from that than anything else.

    Is there a socioeconomic division that separates some Blacks from the rest?
    Absolutely. It’s cyclical, and though I understand it to some extent—especially from a historical perspective; but to a larger I extent now, I don’t get why it persists.

    I say that because for many of the poorer among us, some of them have escaped the grip of the cycle even under the most extreme of circumstances, so there is no question it can be done. Others of us have not and seem to make no effort to want to. A lot of it is about choices and decisions, and about the support networks we build–and work to maintain for each other (beyond just social), and for ourselves as individuals. And ultimately, I think it boils down to the question of–how badly do you want something?

    So, I think there is an SES division that separates some of us, but I don’t believe it has to be that way to the extent that it seems to exist today. –And I know there are a ton of other external variables out there that push this toward the negative, but again, those can be overcome. And that’s just one end of the spectrum. That make any sense?

    Did Obama not really live the “Black Experience”??? (bonus questions…)
    I’m not Obama, so I can’t really say. BUT, I don’t think that it should matter one way or the other. What matters is his service and commitment to the task at hand based upon what he says he plans to deliver.


  18. sunsail Says:

    Hmm. As a term or social construct, i will admit my ingnorance in not knowing what the “Black Experience” means. But if taken literally, I am living the black experience. I’m black. I’ve experienced stuff. Ergo, black experience. I could never say i’m living the asian experience, or the native american experience, now could I?

    darius: that has been your experience, not mine. However, I’m black. How then, can that be called a black experience?

    And about the whole getting treated differently– damn skippy i get treated differently: I DEMAND to be treated differently by the choices I make, my attitude with/towards others, and the words that come out of my mouth. Sorry, but you will have to think two and three times before putting me in the obvious box– and then think some MORE about WHICH box I truly belong in!

    Now, if you want to talk about the immigrant experience, the third world experience (please note that these have NOTHING to do with race), or my favorite, the “oh-mi-god-you-speak-english-so-perfectly-why-don’t-you-have-an-accent-are-you-sure-you’re-hispanic?-but-you’re-black!” experience, holla.


  19. Bygbaby Says:

    Damn, yall breaking it down & I cannot keep up!

    Ayankah – So you are my crowned academic expert here based on the class. 6 hours! Damn sounds like you really got into it & your response here shows that as well.

    I checked out the TRIOS & that is pretty intense thinking.

    I was born in B’ham & lived there until I was 5. I went back summers to stay with my dad & for a period of time, I moved down there with him when I was in the 10th grade. i went to Winona HS like everyone else in my family on my moms & dads side. B’ham is too damn hot & slow for me & since my dad is dead, i do not visit (shame on me for that though).

    Shai – “So I would love to know what this “black experience” is to different folks.” At this point based on my feelings & what I read here, you being Black & living gives you your own “Black Experience”.

    You know next time, I hear someone speak the term in a public forum, I may call them out & ask them to explain what it is.

    Tamra – just call me the light skinned[ed] Montel with hair LOL!!! “Does the common thread of racial identity make us one?
    Not necessarily. Honestly, sometimes I’ve felt most like an outsider among my own people, and it’s not because I want to. There are lots of weird groups, cliques and subdivisions amongst us, and I’ve not found that I fit in to any of them to the point that I feel a sense of “unity.”” I did a post last year (Bygbaby & The Nation -http://www.mindspill.bygbaby.com/2007_02_01_archive.htm), where I talked about being a stranger amongst my own people & it was very disheartening to know that religious beliefs are divisive in our community (in the larger sense).

    On the SES piece, I feel you & what do you mean you ain’t Obama!!! LOL.

    Sunsail – “I am living the black experience. I’m black. I’ve experienced stuff. Ergo, black experience. I could never say i’m living the asian experience, or the native american experience, now could I?” Tiger Woods said it so why not, right??? LOL

    I want to explore that Hispanic piece on a post but need to get my mind right 1st. I wanna know more about what it means to be Black & Hispanic. Is being Hispanic simply cultural, & how does it shape ones racial identity. Maybe you can indulge me!!!!!!!!!!!! In perfect English of course:-)

    Anna C – “One hopes that this will change… and some younger folks coming up report that they don’t feel they are not seeing color the way we did and our parents did and our grandparents did, etc.” I hear this too & I understand why but we don’t know the “others” are thinking. Thx for stopping through@

    Byrdparker – The multiculturalism & assimilation are the side results result of integration since we’s free now.

    Like most are saying, we get treated different no matter what & that in it self is a unifying Black Experience.

    You may be opening a can of worms with “Black Culture”. We have so many subsets & the one thing that I can link to us all is the way we are viewed as a people generally speaking. Maybe I am not focusing correctly & may not have a solid answer!!!

    Bygbaby


  20. Tamra Says:

    Hey Bygbaby, for some reason I can’t get the podcast to download. I have QT, and I tried it in both firefox and explorer, but it’s still not working. ;-(


  21. Mitch Miller Jr. Says:

    This is a quote from below, from Erica C.:

    “…If you have a young black girl and a young white girl growing up in public housing, both girl’s mother and grandmother were products of welfare, uneducated, and jobless. Both girls grow up and repeat this cycle as adults. For each girl. Would this be a “black experience” or a “White experience” In my opinion this would be a “human experience” because both races shared the same experience. I just think that our experiences are just that……our experiences and should not be pinned to a particular race….”

    -I agree, kinda-

    The above quote make sense but when you look at a particular society, their religion, beliefs, etc. makes that society unique and differentiates it from others. In the case of the “Black Experience” yes I’m sure other people may have experienced what “us” black folk go thru, financially, but the “Black Experience” is more that just that! Is everything from the way we treat of ourselves/family, from the way we view society from underneath our BLACK skin/features, from the way we’re viewed by our society thru our BLACK skin/features, being descendents a brutal past (and still live in the same country where it happened), these are just a few….. So yes there is a “Black Experience” and I proud to say that I learned it, lived it, & loved it.

    -lata-


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